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Guidebook for Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare System Coordination and Integration 3rd EdGuidebook for Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare System Coordination and Integration: A Framework for Improved Outcomes, 3rd Edition
Janet K. Wiig and John A. Tuell, with Jessica K. Heldman, Robert F. Kennedy Children’s Actions Corps, 2013

Built from years of collaborative expertise and experience, the newly revised Guidebook for Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare System Coordination and Integration: A Framework for Improved Outcomes, 3rd Edition continues to use a comprehensive framework to guide state and local jurisdictions in achieving greater system coordination and integration for children, youth and families that populate multiple youth serving systems. The Guidebook highlights current research, best practice, and numerous examples from jurisdictions across the country that have worked to develop new practices, policies, procedures and protocols that will serve to improve the outcomes for multi-system children, youth and their families. The Guidebook is joined with a new supporting publication, Dual Status Youth – Technical Assistance Workbook (2013), designed to be used in conjunction with the Guidebook to advance the development of policy and practice for dual status youth.


Dual Status Youth TA WorkbookDual Status Youth – Technical Assistance Workbook
John A. Tuell, Jessica K. Heldman, and Janet K. Wiig, Robert F. Kennedy Children’s Actions Corps, 2013

“Dual status youth” refers to juveniles who come into contact with both the child welfare and juvenile justice systems and occupy various statuses in terms of their relationship to the two systems. The Dual Status Youth – Technical Assistance Workbook is a companion piece to the third edition of the Guidebook for Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare System Coordination and Integration: A Framework for Improved Outcomes (2013), and presents a month-by-month outline of analytical tasks, expectations, products, and timelines that frame the structure of a dual status youth initiative. The Workbook provides detailed guidance for state and local jurisdictions in their endeavor to improve the outcomes for dual status youth and families and to enhance system performance among the critical youth- and family-serving agency partners.


Dual Status Youth Bench Card
Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice

This Dual Status Youth Bench Card was created to provide guidance to judicial officers hearing matters involving dual status youth (DSY) at various stages of court processing, including pre-adjudicatory and dispositional hearings.


Dual Status Youth Initiative Report 1st Ed CoverDual Status Youth Initiative Report, First Edition: Early Gains and Lessons Learned
Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice, 2016

Much has been achieved through the work of several jurisdictions engaged in dual status youth initiatives with the Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice (RFK National Resource Center), led by the Robert F. Kennedy Children’s Action Corps. This report highlights these accomplishments and documents the elements of success as well as challenges and obstacles faced. In DSY initiatives, communities are encouraged to craft action strategies unique to their jurisdiction and therefore measure success by their own metrics. In presenting these metrics, both qualitative and quantitative, this report will provide readers with a clear sense of what may be possible for their own jurisdictions when considering dual status youth reform.


Navigating the Dual Status Terrain Tips for Juvenile Defenders CoverNavigating the Dual Status Terrain: Tips for Juvenile Defenders
National Juvenile Defender Center & Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice, 2015

The experience of a youth as a victim of maltreatment and his or her experience within the child welfare system are often relevant to a delinquency case and its resolution. This resource brief, a collaboration between the Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice and the National Juvenile Defender Center, addresses the unique considerations for juvenile defenders in representing youth who touch both the child welfare and juvenile justice systems, known as dual status youth. The brief offers practice tips for juvenile defenders to help navigate the terrain and explores the defender’s perspective on the growing reform trend of multi-system collaboration and coordination to improve outcomes for dual status youth.


A Better Way to Do Business Changing Organizational CultureA Better Way to Do Business: Changing Organizational Culture to Promote Integrated Service Delivery in Child Protection and Juvenile Justice Systems
Mark Mertens and Melissa Blom (Outagamie County, Wisconsin), Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice, 2014

This inaugural Practice Brief describes how child welfare, juvenile justice, and other youth-serving systems can move from early conversations about working together to developing protocols for how teams work with dually involved youth, and eventually to the establishment of a new way to “do business” by changing the organizational culture. The brief examines the common needs and necessary tasks of personnel at each level of the organization as they relate to the promotion of transformative reform. The authors highlight insights and lessons learned from their work in an RFK National Resource Center Dual Status Youth Initiative in Outagamie County, Wisconsin and as members of the Dual Status Youth Practice Network.


Dependency and Delinquency in SYNC CoverDependency and Delinquency in SYNC
Jessica Heldman and Hon. Sheri Roberts, Report on Trends in State Courts 2014, National Center for State Courts, 2014

Youth who touch both the child welfare and juvenile justice systems, known as dual status youth, present complex, resource-intensive cases and tend to experience poor outcomes. A new report, Dependency and Delinquency in SYNC, describes how courts can support community efforts to integrate and coordinate youth-serving system and improve outcomes for dual status youth, and demonstrates how these strategies have been successfully implemented in Newton County’s (Georgia) project: Serving Youth in Newton County (SYNC). This report was released as part of the National Center for State Courts’ Future Trends in State Courts.


From Conversation to Collaboration How Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Agencies Can Work Together to Improve Outcomes for Dual Status Youth RFKNRCJJ.jpgFrom Conversation to Collaboration: How Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Agencies Can Work Together to Improve Outcomes for Dual Status Youth
Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice, 2014

Did you know that many youth who are involved with the juvenile justice system are victims of maltreatment, neglect, or abuse — and therefore, may also be in contact with the child welfare system? These youth, known as “dual status youth”, are often served by both the child welfare and juvenile justice systems, although those systems may not be coordinating or collaborating to best serve these youth, their families, and the community. This whitepaper highlights the strategies that youth-serving systems can apply to develop a more integrated approach and effectively yield better outcomes for youth and families, enhance system performance, and produce significant cost savings within communities. The paper describes some of the challenges facing dual status youth, outlines the benefits of collaboration, and provides guidance for practitioners to begin a conversation.


Understanding Child Maltreatment and Juvenile DelinquencyUnderstanding Child Maltreatment and Juvenile Delinquency: From Research to Effective Program, Practice, and Systemic Solutions
Janet K. Wiig, C. S. Widom, with John A. Tuell, Child Welfare League of America, 2003

This monograph describes the best research on the connection between child maltreatment and juvenile delinquency. Also includes a description of a wide array of promising responses for improving outcomes for dual jurisdiction youth.